Tips to Raise Your FICO Credit Score

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Your FICO credit score is one of the major factors a lender will consider when determining whether or not to approve you for credit. There are many things that go into your FICO score, which means that there are things that you can do to improve it. Careful attention to your FICO score can help you build your credit.

Here are tips that can help build and raise your FICO score

Apply for credit cards

You may be wondering if applying for credit cards can hurt your credit, but, just the opposite is true when you use them responsibly. The same goes for installment loans. Those with no credit will be a higher credit risk than someone who has demonstrated responsibility by making payments regularly and on time.

Make every payment on time

When you make your payments late, this shows up on your credit report. Lenders do not like to see you making a habit of late payments. As your FICO score is computed, 35% of the score is dependent upon you making timely payments for credit cards and loans. Never missing a payment is the best way to get the most from this factor. The longer the history that you have of making payments on time, the better this part of your score will be.

Pay off balances in full each month

While this is difficult for some, especially those who have accumulated large amounts of debt, making the largest payments you can afford is smart. This will help you lower the balances. Once you get your credit cards paid off, try to pay the entire amount that you owe each month. Never make less than the minimum payment required. The lower your overall balance, or credit utilization, the better your FICO score will be.

Communicate with creditors if there are problems

If you fall on hard times financially, contact your creditors before you begin to miss payments. Often they can work out a temporary solution, or negotiate a payment plan with you before your credit is adversely affected. When you are making regular payments, even when you are struggling financially, you can often keep your credit score from dropping too far.

Don’t rush to close credit cards to raise your FICO score

Closing credit card accounts can actually have a negative impact on your FICO score, especially if you have had the credit card for a long time. If you close credit cards that are paid in full, yet you still have others open that you carry a balance on, then you are going to see your credit score drop because your credit utilization will increase. This means that you will be using a higher percentage of your available credit. You are going to be better off keeping cards open when they have a zero balance, particularly if you have a long history with that creditor.

Keep track of your credit utilization

If you have a high credit utilization or a high debt-to-credit ratio, contact your creditors to see if you can have your credit limit raised. This can help improve your ratio and also your FICO score.

Don’t open too many accounts too close together

This is especially important for new credit users. When you are just starting out, one or two cards is plenty. Even if you have well-established credit, opening too many credit cards in too short a time period will have a negative impact on your FICO score.

Make sure your creditors know how to reach you

Always notify your credit card companies if you have an address change. If you miss a bill because they moved, it will not be their fault. You will likely see a change in your FICO score as a result. This is a common mistake, and one that is completely avoidable.

Immediately report if your card is lost or stolen

Reporting a lost or stolen card as soon as you are aware of it is crucial. Most credit card companies will not hold you liable for unauthorized purchases under these circumstances. If you do not promptly report it, you could be held responsible for large purchases. This will also affect your FICO score.

Check your credit report regularly

You should check your credit report at least once a year. Make sure that there are no inaccuracies. Most free credit reports will get information from the three major credit bureaus—TransUnion, Equifax, and Experian. Checking your credit report will not hurt your credit score. It will help you keep tabs on any accounts that you are responsible for. If you notice any inaccuracies, contact those creditors immediately to have the issue resolved.

Your FICO score is important. You should know what it is and make efforts to keep it solid or improve it. Use these tips to keep your credit great!

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